Wednesday, September 24, 2014

RV snow job

Dear Dr. R.V. Shrink:
We travel a lot during the shoulder season in many parts of the country. We find mostly great weather, less crowds and fewer camping hassles. We do encounter the freak snowstorm on occasion. This can usually be anticipated and prepared for. However, my wife insists on having the slides out every night. She does not like dealing with the smaller kitchen area, or climbing over the bed when they are in. When they are out during a snowfall, I have to deal with frozen, snow-covered slides before we can move on. This often means climbing on the roof of the motorhome to broom off whatever ice and snow has accumulated. Wouldn’t you say she was being unreasonable? —Frosty in Snowmass

Dear Frosty:
It seems to me it would be much easier to deal with the kitchen space limitations than the ice and snow build-up on the slides. Most rigs are designed to be very functional with the slides in. I find it wise to pull them in during many weather events. A strong windstorm can drive you crazy with the slide awnings flapping. If you know the chance of snow is almost certain, it only makes sense to pull them in and eliminate the hassle of dealing with the aftermath. Traveling in snow country during the fall season can be very rewarding with spectacular scenery, fewer crowds, and often cheaper rates.

It is wise to carry a step ladder. A ladder is convenient for maintenance and reaching tall windows for cleaning. It also comes in handy when you need to deal with your slides. There is also a safety issue here which your wife may pay attention too. If you had to move for some type of emergency and your slides were iced up, it would at the least slow your progress or perhaps end up causing damage to the slides. It is something we all deal with. I personally make sure my slides are clean and there is nothing to impede them every time I extend or retract. Depending on the consistency and quantity of snow, a slide is designed to shed it like water. Knowing the cost of slide repair, I prefer to err on the side of caution and clean the snow off before retracting the slide.

The slide awning will be collapsed on the top of the slide and often not retract properly until you remove heavy snow. These issues often come down to common sense. I have left my slides out on many occasions knowing I was going to wait out a snowstorm, warmer weather was forecast, or deciding I would deal with the job of cleaning it off. It comes down to a personal choice, but if you are not comfortable dealing with these conditions, pulling them in is as easy as pushing a button. You might want to explain to your wife the danger of climbing around on a slippery RV roof during or after a snowstorm. —Keep Smilin’, Dr. R.V. Shrink

8 comments:

Ed Price said...

There's also an advantage to be gained by closing your slides during very cold weather. With the slides in, you have a smaller volume of air inside the coach, and that means less air to warm with your furnace. Also, with the slides in, there is less surface area to conduct heat outside. Heating is easier with the slides in. This advice also works for hot weather, when you are trying to keep the inside cool.

Anonymous said...

I am lucky my wife is the first to suggest we pull in the slides. I would try to explain the pro's and con's to her but if she won't see the hazards then I would make the decession and let here complain. Or she could get up on the roofe and clean the snow off.

Anonymous said...

Don't be silly. The wife doesn't have to deal with any snow & ice build up on the slides. Perhaps what you suggested should have been that they have a simpler meal or eat out when the weather may be bad. Then again, if my husband insisted that I cook every meal while traveling (I also drive) then I might be inclined to have him up on the slippery, ice covered roof. HaHa Seriously... Do you make this stuff up?

Anonymous said...

Just let the wife go out and clean off the snow before you have to leave. I'll bet you won't have to do it ever again.

Anonymous said...

Let her get in bed then close the slide, as for the kitchen, its more functional if the slide is in. This is from a woman.....

Anonymous said...

Let her clear the slide after a snowstorm. That should make the decision much more obvious. If you are a senior citizen or near that age, you should not be on a ladder especially when it's icy.

Anonymous said...

Time for an ultimatum. Either the slides come in or SHE has to clean them off. PERIOD.

Anonymous said...

I am the wife and I much prefer the slides in during snowy, cold or windy conditions. It only makes sense to me to have that much less to worry about. Oh btw, I'm the one who has to get up there to clean the canopies because I'm lighter, more agile and not afraid of heights. I also drive. Hmmm, I think I'm the one getting snowed :)