Tuesday, January 29, 2013

RV Party Central

Dear Dr. R.V. Shrink:
We are becoming a bit disappointed in the National Park Service in the Everglades. Perhaps it is budget cuts or personnel shortages. We just spent a couple weeks there and every weekend seems to be party central for the locals. The park gate is wide open all night so people come and go with no one to challenge them. We can deal with most noise during normal hours, but we expect quiet during quiet hours. The park does not seem to enforce any rules regarding quiet time. My wife finally went over to a noisy site and asked them politely to tone it down. They were belligerent and continued with louder music, screaming and yelling. My wife then asked the host to approach them and they did not want to get involved. Park law enforcement never showed up and the partying continued into the wee hours. The next weekend a rerun. Even with budget cuts how expensive can it be to have a ranger drive through the campground a couple times a night and do some volume control work, or ticketing and evicting intoxicated campers and visitors that refuse to follow what most of us would consider rules of courtesy. Many never even paid to come in. That money could help fund more law enforcement. I'm deaf in one ear and nothing bothers me, but I have to deal with my wife who expects everyone to be on their best behavior.
--Partying with the pythons in the park

Dear Python Party:
It is often easy to let rudeness go on and put up with the noise and hope that someone else complains. I give your wife credit for going over and making an attempt. I think she was right to then go to the host. At that point the host should have brought in the Cavalry. I see no excuse for the Park Service to be lax in enforcing any rules they seem fit to create in the first place. Being as close as they are to six million people, they must be aware of the popularity of the park to locals. It only takes a few citations to get the word out that this kind of behavior will not be condoned in the National Park. The Park System does not have partying as any part of their mission statement. My suggestion would be to do all future campers a favor and contact the Park Superintendent. The host is only there to explain the rules, but they have plenty of access to law enforcement who are usually not shy about laying down the law. 
--Keep Smilin', Dr. R.V. Shrink

19 comments:

Anonymous said...

This seems to be an ongoing problem at a lot of popular state park campgrounds as we've had the same trouble in Alabama. And the Park Rangers turn a blind eye to it all. And it's not just at night they allow really loud music to go on all day. We just don't go to most state parks because of this and if we do it's in the fall or winter.

Anonymous said...

IMO some people are simply too sensitive!
The noise is usually only one or two nights a week.
Apparently your wife never partied all night at a campground, if she had she would be more tolerant, (I feel sorry for her).
I suggest she LIGHTEN UP!

Bob said...

I totally agree that there should be active enforcement of "quiet time" rules in all campgrounds. Many of us leave the "regular" world to get away from it all only to have the noise and other distractions follow us to the great outdoors to the point that we cannot hear what nature has to offer. The party folks need to head to South Beach or other places if they want noise all night and leave the campgrounds out of it. And leave your noisy motorcycles home too!

Jan, the Gray Jay said...

Partying all night at national, state and most other public campgrounds is against park rules! If campers intend to party all night they need to find places that don't disturb campers who abide by posted rules. Campground rules apply to all campers.

Jan, the Gray Jay said...

Federal, state, regional and most other public campgrounds have rules that include quiet hours. Campers should read the park rules before they choose a site. If they want to party all night they need to locate campgrounds that allow this activity. Camp officials need to enforce posted rules. Rule breakers should be warned and stopped. Camp rules are established for everyone to follow.

Lee Ensminger said...

Lighten up? Really? Well, my opinion, and I think you'll find it to be the majority opinion, is that people go to campgrounds to get away from "civilization" and enjoy nature in peace. And yes, we do expect you to observe the park rules, including the posted "quiet times." There's a place for the type of behavior you seem to enjoy. It's called your home [unless, of course, your neighbors are tired of putting up with you] or a club, sports bar, places where loud and/or rowdy behavior is acceptable late at night. Generally, I find people who say "You need to lighten up" really translates into "Hey, I like to do whatever I feel like whenever I feel like it and I don't care about anyone else but ME!" And the condescending remark that you "feel sorry" for her, as though she doesn't know how to have a good time is transparently boorish.
Let's have some additional comments and we'll see how the voting goes.

Anonymous said...

I have been a camp host at state and federal parks, and when rowdy campers come in I have always called the rangers. I'm sorry but camp host are responsible. Not to confront but to call in reinforcements. But,it's a shame, there will always be stupid and inconsiderate people no matter where you go. The continuous barking dogs is what I hate.

Anonymous said...

Lighten up???
What about following the rules?
Some folks like to get up early to enjoy nature and if we want to part we go to a night club and party till the law says take it home not to a park.

walt66 said...

too sensitive? Come on, 11pm and loud music. We pay good money to use these NATURE parks. If you want to party go to a club.

Penny said...

This happened to my son and my brother when they were at a state park in Pennsylvania. They were in tents so didn't even have the solid walls of an RV to block out some of the noise. My brother merely took his wood cutting hatchet, went to the offending campsite, and buried it in their picnic table, stood and gave them the "evil eye" and asked, very quietly, if they would tone it down. They immediately quieted down and were good for the rest of the weekend.

However, I'm thinking that with all the kooks out in the country nowadays, one could get shot if they complained.

Unknown said...

To the second comment, why don't YOU grow up you jack ass, the rules are there for a reason, if you want to party, do it in your own place and not where you're going to bother other people.
By your statement you are showing how immature and ignorant you are.
Pat

Kevin Richey said...

It is NOT a matter of his wife being too sensitive, but you are not-sensitized to other's expectations of a camp experience.

It is the norm to expect nature and peace when camping, not loud partying.

It is civilized to be courteous, and respectful of campground rules. The rules are there for a reason. If you chafe at them, then you are either not a respectful person, or your folks job of training of you to become a good person failed.

Bob said...

Only one time in a TN State Park did being drunk, cursing, and loud music bother me. I reported it to the Park Ranger and he brought in the County Sheriff's deputies and together they moved them out of the Park and the people involved were banned from all TN State Parks for 1 year.
I have no problem with friends and families enjoying themselves around a campfire. I have done that myself but at a certain point it becomes necessary to tone things down. There is never any excuse for either party to become belligerent or antagonistic.

Anonymous said...

We like to go to a Bar or Lounge to do our drinking and listen to loud music. We go to a State Park for nature and scenery. So I'm on her side.

Anonymous said...

The above comment ("Lighten Up") sadly reflects a mentality of many in the world today—that if it's good for me, then screw everybody else. I suggest Mr. or Ms. "Lighten Up" think for a moment about what it means to be a good neighbor (remember the Golden Rule?) and reflect upon the value of consideration of others.

Unfortunately, it appears that thinking and reflecting are not part of this person's usual activities.

Anonymous said...

I understand the problem from both standpoints. Many years back I camped with a group of off road folks who enjoyed late parties; when booking in we asked to be put in an area that would isolate us from other campers that would be bothered by our late night preferences...if no such area was available we did our best to tone down our late activities. Today we seem to live in a "Me First" society, where people are only interested with what they want and have little or no concern for others. Common sense indicates that excessive noise or activity should be restrained after a certain hour, but there are an increasing number of individuals whose selfishness leads to justification of whatever activity they want to participate in. The lack of respect and consideration for others goes far beyond the campground.

Seann said...

Why couldn't you make a phone call? We all have cell phones now...
That being said the host should have called in the cavalry and had the party animals thrown out... BUT it is not the hosts job to go over there and intervene.

Anonymous said...

There are also cuts taking place that significantly reduce enforcement of existing rules and regulations:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/100426919/Automatic_Spending_Cuts_Threaten_National_Parks

http://news.yahoo.com/retirees-nps-documents-show-sequestration-cuts-turn-national-211700917.html

Anonymous said...

My husband and I have park hosted in state and national parks for nearly 6 years...when a guest asked us for help or we "hear or see" disruptive behavior "anytime" not just during quite hours!!! we contact the park police..if they do not come or are unavailable..we call 911 and get the sheriff. Drinking can turn into a dangerous situation and people who do not "have a gun" should NEVER confont an unruly guest!!!!